Archive for atherosclerosis

Antioxidant Supplementation in Atherosclerosis Prevention

More evidence supporting antioxidants and health. The dosages used in this study were relatively low, and yet beneficial effects were shown. And this study does not touch on the hundreds of other benefits from antioxidant supplementation.

Synergy Abstract

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Categories : Miscellaneous
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Chlamydia link to atherosclerosis strengthens day by day

Just like most diseases known to man, I think that there are multiple causes of these diseases. And yet, many times we try to look for one answer to everything, and then treat what we think is the one cause. Then we wonder why the patient is never completely cured.

The link between chlamydia infection and atherosclerosis “strengths day by day,” according to one expert reviewing all the evidence to date at the recent XIth International Symposium on Atherosclerosis in Stockholm, Sweden. Another speaker, presenting preliminary results from work on atherectomy specimens from patients with acute myocardial infarction, suggested that chlamydia may be the “final straw that breaks the camel’s back” when it comes to atherosclerotic plaque rupture.

Categories : Miscellaneous
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CRP Concentrations Correlate With the Severity of Atherosclerosis

C-Reactive Protein is a marker for chronic inflammation in the body. Many experts believe that inflammation is a major contributor to heart disease. Make sure that CRP levels are checked with your cholesterol if you are at risk for heart disease.

Eur Heart J 2000;21:958-960,1000-1008 Dr. Mira-Christine Tataru from Herz- und Gefassklinik, in Bad Neustadt/Saale, and colleagues analyzed the relationship between plasma C-reactive protein levels and the severity of atherosclerosis in 1,112 male and 299 female survivors of acute myocardial infarction and in 326 male and 138 female age-matched controls without coronary disease. Confirming prior studies, Dr. Tataru and colleagues report that plasma C-reactive protein levels increase with age and are higher in smokers than in nonsmokers. Additionally, they report that C-reactive protein concentrations are higher in coronary heart disease patients than in control patients. Among survivors of acute myocardial infarction, C-reactive protein levels correlate with the angiographically detected severity of coronary heart disease. It is also noteworthy, the authors say, that C-reactive protein levels were higher not only in patients with clinically manifest atherosclerosis, but also in patients with preclinical stenoses of the pelvic and leg arteries as well as the extracranial arteries supplying the brain, or aneurysm of the abdominal aorta.

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Enhanced Progression of Early Carotid Atherosclerosis & C pneumoniae

We are starting to see more and more evidence that an infectious etiology plays a part in heart disease. I believe that this is a big reason why mainstream medicine has such a problem with heart disease; there is no “one cause, one cure.” Inflammation, hyperinsulinemia, hypertension, oxidation of cholesterol, high homocysteine, infections…the list is quite long. An approach to heart disease prevention needs to be comprehensive and address all these factors. Putting on blinders and lowering only high blood pressure or cholesterol is not good enough.

Circulation — Abstracts: Sander et al. 103 (10): 1390

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Categories : heart disease
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Metabolites of (+)-catechin, quercetin on monocyte adhesion to aorta

Flavonoids are substances found in nature, such as in certain fruits and teas. These substances were shown to lower the ability of monocytes to attach the the walls of arteries and cause damage that ultimately leads to atherosclerosis.

AJCN — Abstracts: Koga and Meydani 73 (5): 941

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Categories : heart disease
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Magnesium sulphate and EDTA in the hypercholesterolaemic rabbit

Chelation therapy for the treatment and potential reversal of atherosclerosis has been viewed negatively for much of it’s history. However, much like a vast majority of alternative practices that have been used for a long time, some portion usually turns out to have some merit.

Synergy : Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism 3 (6), 417-422

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Oxygenated Carotenoid Lutein and Progression of Early Atherosclerosis

This study shows a protective effect of the carotenoid lutein (a cousin of beta carotene) on hardening of the arteries. Something to remember here…it is always beta carotene that gets all the press, and yet nature makes many types of carotenoids and that we need whole foods to get the variety that optimal health needs. Also…some of the best quality multivitamins will also contain a variety of carotenoids.

Circulation — Abstracts: Dwyer et al. 103 (24): 2922

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Infectious Burden and Long-Term Prognosis of Atherosclerosis

I think it is safe to add an infectious mechanism to the list of contributors to cardiovascular disease. A few interesting things here. H. pylori is included in the list of possible infectious agents. Could it be that the infectious agent is there because of some depression in the immune system? Much evidence points to a reduction in gastric Vit C as a risk factor for H. pylori infection. Considering that Vit C has definite benefits in CVD, it may actually be the Vit C and not the H. pylori infection…

Circulation — Abstracts: Espinola-Klein et al. 105 (1): 15

 

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Categories : heart disease, Vitamin C
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Possible Pathogenic Link Between H pylori Infection and Atherosclerosis

I plan on going to my grave believing that H pylori is an opportunistic infection (if not normal flora…) and that the conditions associated with infection (gastric cancer, ulcers, heart disease) are really secondary effects of whatever physiological alterations allowed H pylori to thrive and not the bacteria themselves. Here we see an immunological cross reaction between proteins in H pylori and artery walls. Lest we jump to conclusions, recall that nutrients such as zinc are essential for proper development and maturation of the immune system. Is it possible that a zinc deficiency could lead to faulty maturation and thus cross reaction?

Circulation — Abstracts: Franceschi et al. 106 (4): 430

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Categories : heart disease
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Reduced Progression of Atherosclerosis with Antibiotic Treatment & C. pneumoniae Seropositivity

The research that supports the role of infectious organsims in cardiovascular disease is building, and now we’re seeing the next step…treatment of the condition leads to reduction in the progression of the condition. My only thought…instead of antibiotics I would wonder if certain lifestyle changes designed to improve cardiovascular health may not exert a portion of their effects via supporting the immune system.

Circulation — Abstracts: Sander et al. 106 (19): 2428

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Categories : heart disease
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